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Plant of The Week-Burning Bush

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is the Burning Bush! 

Burning Bush shrub 1 Burning Bush shrub 2 Burning Bush shrub 3


Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Plant Description: 9 to 11 feet tall, spreads 9 to 11 feet, blooms from May to June, no (insignificant) flower

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part shade, tolerates clay soil and black walnut, low maintenance is required 

Uses: Versatile shrub for landscape with outstanding fall color. Specimen, group or mass. Hedge, screen, shrub border or foundation plant.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Adaptable shrub which tolerates a wide range of soils except for wet, poorly-drained ones. Also tolerates considerable shade. Strong, branching growth habit enables plant to tolerates heavy pruning.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, Ask The Arborist, landscape

Emerald Ash Borer Update

Posted by Rachael Monico on Thu, Aug 18, 2016 @ 09:23 AM

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Emerald Ash Borer

Since discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer in Douglas County in June, our arborists have been busy treating and diagnosing trees.  Here are a few questions that have come up that deserve some clarification.

 

 

Is there still time to treat my Ash Tree this year? 

EABexithole.jpgCM's A Cut Above is using the trunk injection method, utilizing a product called TREE-äge.  This particular treatment is an every two-year application.  It is labeled for application from April-October.  There is still time to provide protection for your Ash Trees. 

 

How long can you extend the life of my tree by treating my Ash Trees?

Although there are no guarantees, a healthy Ash Tree can be expected to survive another 15+ years when injecting with TREE-äge . 

Do I need to treat my trees for the lifespan of the tree?

Yes.  Under the current guidelines with the product we are using, it is necessary to treat on an every two year basis for the lifespan of the tree.

Should I treat for Emerald Ash Borer?

Before treating any Ash Tree consider the following:

  •  Maturity of Tree
  •  Effect on Property Value
  •  Effect on Energy Cost
  •  Sentimental Value
  •  Cost of Removal/Replacement

If my tree is infected, how quickly will I see the damage?

D-Shaped exit holes, thinning canopy, and epicormics sprouts are all symptoms of EAB.  This process can take several years.

 

Visit our blog for more information about EAB or call to have a licensed arborist diagnose your ash tree.

  

  Contact A Licensed Arborist

Topics: Tree Care, Ask The Arborist, EAB, japanese beetle

Plant of The Week-Hostas

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 15, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is Hostas!

 

Ideal Growing Zone: 3 to 8 

Plant Description: 0.75 to 1.00 feet tall, span 2.00 to 2.50 feet, blooms from July to August

Growing Conditions: Grows best in part shade to full shade, tolerates heavy shade, and Black Walnut, low maintenance required

Uses: Notwithstanding the often showy flowers produced, hostas are primarily grown in shady areas for the often ornamental excellence of their foliage. Very effective in groups or massed. Good background plant. Shady borders, shade gardens or woodland gardens.

Plant Care: Established plants have some tolerance for dry shade (particularly plants with thick leaves), but soils should never be allowed to dry out. Full size and quality form are best achieved with consistent moisture. Water is best applied directly to the soil beneath the leaves. Divide plants as needed in spring or autumn. Division is usually easiest in early spring before the leaves unfurl. Plant in locations protected from wind.

Pests and Disease: Slugs and snails are attracted to the foliage, chewing jagged holes in the leaves, and if left unchecked, can cause serious damage over a fairly short period of time. Watch for foliar nematodes which feed on the leaves causing interveinal browning. Leaf spots and crown rot are less frequent problems. Plants infected with Hosta Virus X (HVX), tobacco rattle virus or tomato ring spot virus should be immediately removed from garden areas and destroyed. Otherwise, hostas are virtually pest-free and are considered ideal low-maintenance garden perennials. Leaves, particularly of exposed plants, can be severely damaged by hail storms. Leaves are commonly eaten, often voraciously, by deer.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Contact A Licensed Arborist


According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Northern Sea Oats

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 08, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

This week, the Plant of the Week is Northern Sea Oats!


Ideal Growing Zone: 3 to 8

Plant Description: 2 to 5 feet tall, spreads 1 to 2.5 feet, blooms from August to September, green flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part shade, tolerates black walnut, low maintenance is required 

Uses: Provides excellent contrast and texture almost year-round to the border, shaded garden, native plant garden, naturalized area, along streams or on the periphery of the water garden. Naturalize or use as specimens or accents.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium to wet, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerant of poor soils, but prefers moist, fertile soils. One of the more shade tolerant of the ornamental grasses. self-seeds and may spread aggressively. Leaving foliage in place over winter adds interest to the landscape and helps protect crowns from the cold. Cut back to the ground in early spring.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems. May need staking or other support.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Tree Care - Immediately planting a tree where there was an old stump

Posted by Rachael Monico on Fri, Aug 05, 2016 @ 02:55 PM

askthearboristIt is not recommended.  A stump grinder will typically remove about 12 inches of stump below grade.  A tree’s root system grows horizontally with feeder roots, which are responsible for water and “food” uptake. It also drops anchor roots to stabilize and balance the weight of the tree.  When a new tree is planted, it needs plenty of room to establish a structurally sound root system.  This is difficult if the tree is surrounded by large roots left by the old tree.  Grinding a stump also leaves behind sawdust and woodchips in the soil. The decomposition process of these items uses a large amount of nitrogen, which is a vital nutrient to a new tree’s healthy leaf production. In general, it may take 4-6 years for a stump and large root system to decompose. After that process has taken place, there will be room in the soil for the roots of a new tree to grow and the nitrogen will have been replenished.

 

Tree rootsIf you wish to plant a new tree immediately after removing an old tree, it is recommended that the new tree be planted a minimum of 3 feet away from the trunk of the old tree. Depending on the size of the old tree, you may need to go further than 3 feet to be able to dig through the old tree’s roots.

 

If you have a tree that is showing signs of decline, or if you simply want an expert to take a look and assess your trees, contact a CM’s licensed arborist for a tree care and health evaluation.

 

  Contact CM's to find  the perfect tree for  your yard

 

 

Topics: Tree Care, Ask The Arborist

Plant of The Week-Eastern Red Bud Tree

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 01, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is the Eastern Red Bud Tree!


Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Plant Description: 20.00 to 30.00 feet tall, spreads 25.00 to 35.00 feet, blooms in April, pink flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun, tolerates deer, clay soil, and black walnut, low maintenance required 

Uses: Specimen or small groups. Lawns, shrub borders, woodland margins, or along patios. Street tree or lawn tree. Attractive in naturalized settings.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Plants perform best in moderately fertile soils with regular and consistent moisture. Avoid wet or poorly drained soils. Since this tree does not transplant well, it should be planted when young and left undisturbed.

Pests and Disease: Canker can be a significant disease problem. Verticillium wilt, dieback, leaf spots, mildew and blights may also occur. Insect pests include Japanese beetles, tree hoppers, leaf hoppers, caterpillars, borers, webworms and scale. Keeping the tree vigorous by regular watering and fertilization and by pruning out dead branches as needed will help keep the tree healthy.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Dogwood

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Jul 25, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

This week, the Plant of the Week is Dogwood! 


Ideal Growing Zone: 5 to 9

Plant Description: 15 to 30 feet tall, spreads 15 to 30 feet, blooms from April to May, showy flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part, tolerates shade, deer, clay soil, black walnut, some maintenance is required 

Uses: Popular as a specimen or small grouping on residential property around homes, near patios or in lawns. Also effective in woodland, bird or native plant gardens.

Plant Care: Bright red fruits are bitter and inedible to humans (some authors say poisonous) but are loved by birds. Fruits mature in late summer to early fall and may persist until late in the year.

Pests and Disease: Flowering dogwood, when stressed, is susceptible to a rather large number of disease problems, the most serious of which is dogwood anthracnose. Although this anthracnose is not yet a serious problem in Missouri, it has caused considerable devastation in parts of the eastern U.S. Plants are also susceptible to powdery mildew, leaf spot, canker, root rot and leaf and twig blight. Stressed trees also become vulnerable to borers. Leaf miner and scale are less serious potential insect pests.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Dianthus

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Jul 18, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is Dianthus!


Ideal Growing Zone: 3 to 8 

Plant Description: 0.25 to 0.50 feet tall, spreads 0.50 to 1.00 feet, blooms from May to June

Growing Conditions: Grows best with full sun exposure, tolerates deer, low maintenance is required

Uses: Provides masses of color and good contrast for the rock garden or small border front. Good edging plant. Dense mats may be grown together to form an interesting ground cover. May also be grown on difficult sites such as stone walls.

Plant Care: Remove spent flowers to promote continued bloom. Avoid planting in areas with poor drainage where crowns will remain wet in winter.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems. Crown rot may occur in wet, poorly-drained conditions.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Contact A Licensed Arborist


According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Karl Foerster Reed Grass

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Jul 11, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

This week the Plant of the Week is Karl Foerster Reed Grass!


Ideal Growing Zone: 5 to 9

Plant Description: 3 to 5 feet tall, spreads1.5 to 2.5 feet, blooms from May to February, pinkish-purple flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun, tolerates erosion, wet soil, black walnut, and air pollution, low maintenance is required 

Uses: Mass, group or specimen. Excellent vertical accent for borders and for narrow spaces in the landscape. Also effective in moist low spots or on pond/stream banks.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium to wet soils in full sun. Blooms well in light shade, and actually appreciates some part afternoon shade in hot summer climates such as the St. Louis area, but generally tends to produce fewer flowers and develop floppier foliage as the amount of shade increases. Prefers rich, consistently moist soils that do not dry out. Reportedly does well in heavy clay soils, unlike many other kinds of ornamental grasses. Cut clumps to the ground in late winter just before the new spring shoots appear.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems. Watch for rust, particularly after prolonged rainy periods.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Crabapple Tree

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Jul 04, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is the Crabapple Tree!

Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Plant Description: 15.00 to 20.00 feet tall, spreads 15.00 to 20.00 feet, blooms April to May, flower is deep pinkish red, white, red, or pink

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun, tolerates air pollution , low maintenance required

Uses: Excellent as a small, flowering lawn tree or street tree. Effective as a specimen or in groups.

Plant Care: Best grown in loamy, medium moisture, well-drained, acidic soil in full sun. Adapts to a wide range of soils. Prune May to early June (i.e., after flowering but before flower buds form for the following year).

Pests and Disease: Reportedly has high disease resistance. Potential insect pests include tent caterpillars, aphids, Japanese beetles, borers, spider mites and scale.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape