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Plant of The Week-Magnolia Tree

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Sep 26, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is the Magnolia Tree!

( Saucer Magnolia) 


Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 9

Plant Description: 20.00 to 25.00 feet tall, spreads 20.00 to 25.00 feet, blooms in March, White flushed with purple flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part shade, tolerates clay soil, some maintenance is required

Uses: Beautiful specimen flowering tree for lawns.

Plant Care: Best grown in moist, acidic, organically rich, well-drained  in full sun to part shade. Generally intolerant of soil extremes (dry or wet). Site in locations protected from strong winds, but avoid southern exposures close to houses where the buds may be induced to open too early in spring. Plants appreciate consistent and regular moisture throughout the year.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems. Leaf spot and canker can be troublesome. Watch for scale. Late spring frosts may damage flowers.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Lamb's Ear

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Sep 12, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is Lamb's Ear!

 


Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Plant Description: 0.75 to 1.50 feet tall, spans 1.00 to 1.50 feet, blooms May to July

Growing Conditions: Grows best with full sun exposure, tolerates rabbit, deer, drought, dry soil, shallow-rocky soil, black walnut, and air pollution, low maintenance is required

Uses: Foliage provides interesting texture and color to the border or rock garden. Effective edger or small area ground cover.

Plant Care: Appreciates some light afternoon shade in hot climates. Too much shade, however, may impede leaf drying and promote the onset of disease. Avoid overhead watering. Pick off damaged leaves as needed to tidy planting. Divide when necessary or to fill in bare patches. Spreads by creeping stems that root as they go along the ground and can be aggressive in rich soils. Plant 12-18" apart for use as a ground cover.

Pests and Disease: Tends to rot and develop leaf diseases in humid summer climates. Well-drained soils are essential in order to combat potential rot problems which often occur in humid St. Louis summers. Even with well-drained soils, some summer die-out may occur where high humidity and/or moisture on foliage is present. Can spread aggressively.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Contact A Licensed Arborist


According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Flame Grass

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Sep 05, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

This week the Plant of the Week is Flame Grass!


Ideal Growing Zone: 5 to 9

Plant Description: 4 to 5 feet tall, spreads 2.5 to 3 feet, blooms from July to February, red-tinged flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part shade, tolerates drought, erosion, dry soil, black walnut, and air pollution, low maintenance is required 

Uses: Versatile ornamental grass. Accent, specimen, grouping, mass or screen. Borders, meadows, wild gardens, cottage gardens, naturalized areas or pond/water garden peripheries.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerant of a wide range of soils from well-drained sandy soils to the heavy clays present in much of the St. Louis area. Prefers moist soils. Best in full sun. Less vigorous with decreased flowering and tendency to flop in too much shade. Tolerant of summer heat and humidity. Clumps slowly expand in circumference by short rhizomes, but retain tight clump shape. Foliage should be left standing throughout the winter for visual interest and to provide protection for the crowns. Cut foliage to the ground in late winter just before new shoots appear.

Pests and Disease: No frequently occurring insect or disease problems. In some areas of the U.S., miscanthus mealybug and miscanthus blight are becoming significant problems. Miscanthus mealybug causes stunted growth and is difficult to eradicate because it lives inside the stems. Miscanthus blight is a fungal disease which attacks the blades and sheaths.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Ginko Tree

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 29, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is the Ginko Tree!


Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Plant Description: 20.00 to 25.00 feet tall, spreads 12.00 to 18.00 feet, blooms in April, green flower

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun, tolerates deer, clay soil, and air pollution, low maintenance required 

Uses: Excellent small specimen for small areas in the landscape. Plant in locations where the unusual tubular leaves can be easily observed. If carefully pruned, this ginkgo can be maintained as a small specimen or as a container plant.

Plant Care: Best grown in moist, sandy, well-drained soils in full sun. Young plants should be staked for support.

Pests and Disease: No known serious insect or disease problems.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Burning Bush

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 22, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is the Burning Bush! 

Burning Bush shrub 1 Burning Bush shrub 2 Burning Bush shrub 3


Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Plant Description: 9 to 11 feet tall, spreads 9 to 11 feet, blooms from May to June, no (insignificant) flower

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part shade, tolerates clay soil and black walnut, low maintenance is required 

Uses: Versatile shrub for landscape with outstanding fall color. Specimen, group or mass. Hedge, screen, shrub border or foundation plant.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Adaptable shrub which tolerates a wide range of soils except for wet, poorly-drained ones. Also tolerates considerable shade. Strong, branching growth habit enables plant to tolerates heavy pruning.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, Ask The Arborist, landscape

Plant of The Week-Hostas

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 15, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is Hostas!

 

Ideal Growing Zone: 3 to 8 

Plant Description: 0.75 to 1.00 feet tall, span 2.00 to 2.50 feet, blooms from July to August

Growing Conditions: Grows best in part shade to full shade, tolerates heavy shade, and Black Walnut, low maintenance required

Uses: Notwithstanding the often showy flowers produced, hostas are primarily grown in shady areas for the often ornamental excellence of their foliage. Very effective in groups or massed. Good background plant. Shady borders, shade gardens or woodland gardens.

Plant Care: Established plants have some tolerance for dry shade (particularly plants with thick leaves), but soils should never be allowed to dry out. Full size and quality form are best achieved with consistent moisture. Water is best applied directly to the soil beneath the leaves. Divide plants as needed in spring or autumn. Division is usually easiest in early spring before the leaves unfurl. Plant in locations protected from wind.

Pests and Disease: Slugs and snails are attracted to the foliage, chewing jagged holes in the leaves, and if left unchecked, can cause serious damage over a fairly short period of time. Watch for foliar nematodes which feed on the leaves causing interveinal browning. Leaf spots and crown rot are less frequent problems. Plants infected with Hosta Virus X (HVX), tobacco rattle virus or tomato ring spot virus should be immediately removed from garden areas and destroyed. Otherwise, hostas are virtually pest-free and are considered ideal low-maintenance garden perennials. Leaves, particularly of exposed plants, can be severely damaged by hail storms. Leaves are commonly eaten, often voraciously, by deer.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Contact A Licensed Arborist


According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Northern Sea Oats

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 08, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

This week, the Plant of the Week is Northern Sea Oats!


Ideal Growing Zone: 3 to 8

Plant Description: 2 to 5 feet tall, spreads 1 to 2.5 feet, blooms from August to September, green flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part shade, tolerates black walnut, low maintenance is required 

Uses: Provides excellent contrast and texture almost year-round to the border, shaded garden, native plant garden, naturalized area, along streams or on the periphery of the water garden. Naturalize or use as specimens or accents.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium to wet, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerant of poor soils, but prefers moist, fertile soils. One of the more shade tolerant of the ornamental grasses. self-seeds and may spread aggressively. Leaving foliage in place over winter adds interest to the landscape and helps protect crowns from the cold. Cut back to the ground in early spring.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems. May need staking or other support.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Eastern Red Bud Tree

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Aug 01, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is the Eastern Red Bud Tree!


Ideal Growing Zone: 4 to 8

Plant Description: 20.00 to 30.00 feet tall, spreads 25.00 to 35.00 feet, blooms in April, pink flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun, tolerates deer, clay soil, and black walnut, low maintenance required 

Uses: Specimen or small groups. Lawns, shrub borders, woodland margins, or along patios. Street tree or lawn tree. Attractive in naturalized settings.

Plant Care: Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Plants perform best in moderately fertile soils with regular and consistent moisture. Avoid wet or poorly drained soils. Since this tree does not transplant well, it should be planted when young and left undisturbed.

Pests and Disease: Canker can be a significant disease problem. Verticillium wilt, dieback, leaf spots, mildew and blights may also occur. Insect pests include Japanese beetles, tree hoppers, leaf hoppers, caterpillars, borers, webworms and scale. Keeping the tree vigorous by regular watering and fertilization and by pruning out dead branches as needed will help keep the tree healthy.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Dogwood

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Jul 25, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

This week, the Plant of the Week is Dogwood! 


Ideal Growing Zone: 5 to 9

Plant Description: 15 to 30 feet tall, spreads 15 to 30 feet, blooms from April to May, showy flowers

Growing Conditions: Grows best in full sun to part, tolerates shade, deer, clay soil, black walnut, some maintenance is required 

Uses: Popular as a specimen or small grouping on residential property around homes, near patios or in lawns. Also effective in woodland, bird or native plant gardens.

Plant Care: Bright red fruits are bitter and inedible to humans (some authors say poisonous) but are loved by birds. Fruits mature in late summer to early fall and may persist until late in the year.

Pests and Disease: Flowering dogwood, when stressed, is susceptible to a rather large number of disease problems, the most serious of which is dogwood anthracnose. Although this anthracnose is not yet a serious problem in Missouri, it has caused considerable devastation in parts of the eastern U.S. Plants are also susceptible to powdery mildew, leaf spot, canker, root rot and leaf and twig blight. Stressed trees also become vulnerable to borers. Leaf miner and scale are less serious potential insect pests.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Ask the Arborist

According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape

Plant of The Week-Dianthus

Posted by Andrea Monico on Mon, Jul 18, 2016 @ 07:30 AM

 This week, the Plant of the Week is Dianthus!


Ideal Growing Zone: 3 to 8 

Plant Description: 0.25 to 0.50 feet tall, spreads 0.50 to 1.00 feet, blooms from May to June

Growing Conditions: Grows best with full sun exposure, tolerates deer, low maintenance is required

Uses: Provides masses of color and good contrast for the rock garden or small border front. Good edging plant. Dense mats may be grown together to form an interesting ground cover. May also be grown on difficult sites such as stone walls.

Plant Care: Remove spent flowers to promote continued bloom. Avoid planting in areas with poor drainage where crowns will remain wet in winter.

Pests and Disease: No serious insect or disease problems. Crown rot may occur in wet, poorly-drained conditions.

If you want to know more about this plant, have a plant you want to be featured next week, or have any questions in general, please contact us!
Contact A Licensed Arborist


According to the USDA plant hardiness zone map, Omaha is considered to be in plants zone 4b-5b.

 
 

Topics: CMs A Cut Above, landscape